banner.gif (3613 Byte)

Corner.gif 1x1.gif Corner.gif
1x1.gif You are at: Home - Discussion Forum 1x1.gif
Corner.gif 1x1.gif Corner.gif
      
round_corner_upleft.gif (837 Byte) 1x1.gif (807 Byte) round_corner_upright.gif (837 Byte)

Go Back   Gordon Lightfoot Forums > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 05-14-2003, 10:48 PM   #1
BrightSide
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 33
Default

OK, after several months posting on this board, here's my first topic--be kind!

It was suggested by Oma, Gwen, Brink, Cathy, Auburn Annie, and Borderstone's reminiscences in the "Celebration" thread. Got me to thinking about all the (often ridiculous) music you listen to while growing up. I think this subject deserves its own thread. What would be your early musical influences?

I don't mean pop or rock or stuff like kiddie records. I mean things that really helped form your musical tastes but might be considered a little, well, weird by your contemporaries. Maybe they were your parents' records? Those younger than me (and such an exercise can *really* date you!) might have Gord as such an influence--but that wouldn't be embarrassing, like some of mine!

My partial list (I'll add to it as more occur to me):

--A "Newport Folk Festival" album set that featured Cisco Houston, the Weavers, Tommy Makem, Odetta, etc.

--Burl Ives' Sing-Along Song Book collection;

--A Bing Crosby sing-along album (which was snatches of old songs put together in medleys);

--the Mormon Tabernacle Choir's "Songs of the North and South" (Civil War--I heard this playing in the Train Museum in Gettysburg years later);

--Marty Robbin's hot pink "Gunfighter Ballads and Trail Songs" album;

--The Frankie Laine album with the theme from "Rawhide" on it;

--Alan Sherman's "My Son the Folksinger" (which for some reason my Catholic family has to listen to at least once at Christmastime);

--The Nat King Cole Christmas album;

--Harry Belafonte at Carnegie Hall;

--"My Fair Lady" and "Music Man" Broadway shows; and

--"Ellington Indigos."

Anybody else?

[This message has been edited by MaryEllen (edited May 14, 2003).]
BrightSide is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2003, 10:48 PM   #2
MaryEllen
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Cheverly, Maryland, USA
Posts: 50
Default

OK, after several months posting on this board, here's my first topic--be kind!

It was suggested by Oma, Gwen, Brink, Cathy, Auburn Annie, and Borderstone's reminiscences in the "Celebration" thread. Got me to thinking about all the (often ridiculous) music you listen to while growing up. I think this subject deserves its own thread. What would be your early musical influences?

I don't mean pop or rock or stuff like kiddie records. I mean things that really helped form your musical tastes but might be considered a little, well, weird by your contemporaries. Maybe they were your parents' records? Those younger than me (and such an exercise can *really* date you!) might have Gord as such an influence--but that wouldn't be embarrassing, like some of mine!

My partial list (I'll add to it as more occur to me):

--A "Newport Folk Festival" album set that featured Cisco Houston, the Weavers, Tommy Makem, Odetta, etc.

--Burl Ives' Sing-Along Song Book collection;

--A Bing Crosby sing-along album (which was snatches of old songs put together in medleys);

--the Mormon Tabernacle Choir's "Songs of the North and South" (Civil War--I heard this playing in the Train Museum in Gettysburg years later);

--Marty Robbin's hot pink "Gunfighter Ballads and Trail Songs" album;

--The Frankie Laine album with the theme from "Rawhide" on it;

--Alan Sherman's "My Son the Folksinger" (which for some reason my Catholic family has to listen to at least once at Christmastime);

--The Nat King Cole Christmas album;

--Harry Belafonte at Carnegie Hall;

--"My Fair Lady" and "Music Man" Broadway shows; and

--"Ellington Indigos."

Anybody else?

[This message has been edited by MaryEllen (edited May 14, 2003).]
MaryEllen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2003, 12:05 AM   #3
Tyler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Manchester, England
Posts: 595
Default

I don't remember names of albums but, here's somewhat of a list:

Nat King Cole
Marty Robbins
Burl Ives
all of which you had mentioned
Patsy Cline
Polka bands (I don't think any of my musically tastes came from the Polka Bands).
Johnny Cash
Herb Alpert (the album with the naked girl in whipped cream - I was amazed that someone would do that! I must have been sheltered then)

A bit of a mix to say the least. Those are the ones I really remember.
Tyler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2003, 12:05 AM   #4
brink
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: USA
Posts: 1,388
Default

I don't remember names of albums but, here's somewhat of a list:

Nat King Cole
Marty Robbins
Burl Ives
all of which you had mentioned
Patsy Cline
Polka bands (I don't think any of my musically tastes came from the Polka Bands).
Johnny Cash
Herb Alpert (the album with the naked girl in whipped cream - I was amazed that someone would do that! I must have been sheltered then)

A bit of a mix to say the least. Those are the ones I really remember.
brink is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2003, 06:34 AM   #5
Jack
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

For my all time fav, North American folk - Glen Yarborough

For my yen for Celtic fiddle music (Natalie MacMaster from Cape Breton NS probably is the one that gets the most cd play in my house after Gord) - the Sunday morning Irish program on my parents' am radio station

For my cds of new age/nature recordings - the hokey 60's big orchestra instrumental (elevator music?)albums my mom listened to on Saturdays while cleaning the house

For my enjoyment of any music just for what it does for the soul - watching my dad jazz to his big band recordings

Great question for your first topic, Mary Ellen.

Jack
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2003, 06:34 AM   #6
Jack
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

For my all time fav, North American folk - Glen Yarborough

For my yen for Celtic fiddle music (Natalie MacMaster from Cape Breton NS probably is the one that gets the most cd play in my house after Gord) - the Sunday morning Irish program on my parents' am radio station

For my cds of new age/nature recordings - the hokey 60's big orchestra instrumental (elevator music?)albums my mom listened to on Saturdays while cleaning the house

For my enjoyment of any music just for what it does for the soul - watching my dad jazz to his big band recordings

Great question for your first topic, Mary Ellen.

Jack
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2003, 07:55 AM   #7
Auburn Annie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 3,113
Default

Ooo, I almost forgot one: Fred Waring and the Pennsylvanians' "Twas the Night Before Christmas" album, with a sound effects 'Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer' that cracked us kids up every time we heard it. We wore the cover right off the album, and one of my sisters (I have eight siblings)years later found an audio cassette of it, and gave it to all of us for Christmas one year. I've tormented my own kids with it from time to time.
Auburn Annie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2003, 07:55 AM   #8
Auburn Annie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 3,113
Default

Ooo, I almost forgot one: Fred Waring and the Pennsylvanians' "Twas the Night Before Christmas" album, with a sound effects 'Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer' that cracked us kids up every time we heard it. We wore the cover right off the album, and one of my sisters (I have eight siblings)years later found an audio cassette of it, and gave it to all of us for Christmas one year. I've tormented my own kids with it from time to time.
Auburn Annie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2003, 09:41 AM   #9
DMD3
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

When I was just a weee 4yr. old, I liked Billy Ray Sirus.(forgive me if I mispelled it) As a 7-8 yr. old, I liked Tracy Lawrence. I had no CDs but tapes back then.
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2003, 09:41 AM   #10
DMD3
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

When I was just a weee 4yr. old, I liked Billy Ray Sirus.(forgive me if I mispelled it) As a 7-8 yr. old, I liked Tracy Lawrence. I had no CDs but tapes back then.
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2003, 10:37 AM   #11
Steve DeRosa
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 138
Default

Well, I guess if you read those other posts by me you would already have an idea of the wacky musical upbringing I had! Ecclectic music abounded at our house, usually played very loudly and enthusiastically by my dad. When we weren't listening to music at home, he was dragging us around to old "junk shops" and "bargain barns" in search of old, used musical instruments and record albums!

I don't remember all the album titles, mostly just the artists...here goes...a partial list:

The Barking Dogs..."Jingle Bells"
Jorgie Jeorgensen (sp?)..."I Yust Go Nuts at Christmas"

Elvis...Gospel, Christmas songs, and of course Rock

Marty Robbins
Johnny Cash
Patsy Cline
Hank Williams
The Statler Brothers

Herb Alpert and the Tiajuana Brass
The Harmonicats
Lawrence Welk

The sound track from "2001, a Space Odyssey"
The sound track from "Dueling Banjos"

Piano Roll recordings...Rag, Boogie and Honky Tonk
Music Machine Recordings ( I don't know how to explain these! They were giant machines with all sorts of instruments (strings, horns, percussion, etc) attached to them and if you put money in, they would play an entire song using..oh, I don't know...pneumatics or something like that to power the instruments...pretty cool to watch in person)

John Phillips Sousa Marches
William Tell Overature
Glenn Miller
Louis Armstrong
Paul Whiteman and Orchestra
Polka's

My uncles playing banjos in the livingroom...I just loved that, we cousins got to play the triangle and tambourine along with them.

Lot's and lots of 50's and early 60's rock!

Oh, and one of my favorite songs from back then was "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly", I would beg for nickels to play that one on the jukebox everytime I saw it listed!

Oh, and how this all influenced me? I forgot about that part of the topic!!! I guess I was influenced by the Orchestras and Big Bands enough to beg for a flute in 7th grade and to learn it and play it and enjoy being part of a band for the remainder of my school years (I still have the flute, it is very special to me). I really miss playing in a large band so, when I finally have a few moments to myself when the kids are raised, I plan on joining a community orchestra so I can enjoy that musical involvement again.

[This message has been edited by Oma (edited May 15, 2003).]
Steve DeRosa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2003, 10:37 AM   #12
Oma
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 284
Default

Well, I guess if you read those other posts by me you would already have an idea of the wacky musical upbringing I had! Ecclectic music abounded at our house, usually played very loudly and enthusiastically by my dad. When we weren't listening to music at home, he was dragging us around to old "junk shops" and "bargain barns" in search of old, used musical instruments and record albums!

I don't remember all the album titles, mostly just the artists...here goes...a partial list:

The Barking Dogs..."Jingle Bells"
Jorgie Jeorgensen (sp?)..."I Yust Go Nuts at Christmas"

Elvis...Gospel, Christmas songs, and of course Rock

Marty Robbins
Johnny Cash
Patsy Cline
Hank Williams
The Statler Brothers

Herb Alpert and the Tiajuana Brass
The Harmonicats
Lawrence Welk

The sound track from "2001, a Space Odyssey"
The sound track from "Dueling Banjos"

Piano Roll recordings...Rag, Boogie and Honky Tonk
Music Machine Recordings ( I don't know how to explain these! They were giant machines with all sorts of instruments (strings, horns, percussion, etc) attached to them and if you put money in, they would play an entire song using..oh, I don't know...pneumatics or something like that to power the instruments...pretty cool to watch in person)

John Phillips Sousa Marches
William Tell Overature
Glenn Miller
Louis Armstrong
Paul Whiteman and Orchestra
Polka's

My uncles playing banjos in the livingroom...I just loved that, we cousins got to play the triangle and tambourine along with them.

Lot's and lots of 50's and early 60's rock!

Oh, and one of my favorite songs from back then was "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly", I would beg for nickels to play that one on the jukebox everytime I saw it listed!

Oh, and how this all influenced me? I forgot about that part of the topic!!! I guess I was influenced by the Orchestras and Big Bands enough to beg for a flute in 7th grade and to learn it and play it and enjoy being part of a band for the remainder of my school years (I still have the flute, it is very special to me). I really miss playing in a large band so, when I finally have a few moments to myself when the kids are raised, I plan on joining a community orchestra so I can enjoy that musical involvement again.

[This message has been edited by Oma (edited May 15, 2003).]
Oma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2003, 04:29 PM   #13
Borderstone
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Phoenix,Arizona -America
Posts: 4,431
Default

Funny,I was thinking of something like this last night (Wed.) Well,if I remember back to as far as my mind will go,I know that up until about the age of 11,I really only listened to my parents and Grandmother's music. My earliest influences were my "Gram's" (that's what we called her) victrola 78's. For those of you under the age of 30 those are heavy wax records that played just a little faster than vinyl 45rpm's. I don't recall the names of the artists but one song was called,"Who's that knockin' at my door?" and the other was,"Deese,Doze and Dem" (these,those and them.) There were a lot more and I;m sure some of them were from the 19 teens and 1920's! (They're all gone now,as well as the victrola.) Both she and my parents shared mostly the same tastes,Frank Sinatra-Bing Crosby-The Andrews Sisters-Glenn Miller-Tommy Dorsey-Johnnie Ray and others that were on the more "square" side. My parents were teens in the Mid-1950's and they were only slightly less the record buying hounds that I am. I listened to their 45's of Elvis,Buddy Holly,Dale Hawkins,Jerry Lee Lewis,Fats Domino,Little Richard etc.. They even had 1 or 2 Beatles songs,which is surprising considering they were over 25 at the time of,"All You Need Is Love" and "Yellow Submarine"! Fortunatley,when my parents were younger,they weren't a "drag",as was the term then. Finally,when I was old enough to buy my own,I pretty much dove into as much as I could (while staying away from more offensive stuff,which later was not so offensive.) I couldn't possibly go into LP names either because along with some of my parents records and the one's I've bought since...it would take at least 7 or 8 different threads to make the entire list,so I wont even attempt a partial one. One thing we do know though,Gordon is the only artist,besides Mariah Carey,that I have each and every LP (Cass. & CD) that they put out. I have many favorites and many influences which I guess in a group of followers would make me toatally an outsider. ..and of course,I like it that way. It's been the B! I'll catch ya on the flipside of Sundown!
Borderstone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2003, 05:43 PM   #14
violet Blue Horse
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

The most embarassing one on the list is Rod McKuen. I still own those albums, and yes, ahem, some books. The other two would be Dylan and Charlie Rich. Charlie Rich created a life long affinity for a good blues piano riff, and his phrasing has never left me. It's still there when I sing in the shower. Dylan taught me to appreciate a well written lyric. Don't ask me what Rod McKuen taught me. I'm still trying to figure that out. Though he does have a way with putting lyrics and music together.


[QUOTE]Originally posted by MaryEllen:
[B]OK, after several months posting on this board, here's my first topic--be kind!

It was suggested by Oma, Gwen, Brink, Cathy, Auburn Annie, and Borderstone's reminiscences in the "Celebration" thread. Got me to thinking about all the (often ridiculous) music you listen to while growing up. I think this subject deserves its own thread. What would be your early musical influences?

I don't mean pop or rock or stuff like kiddie records. I mean things that really helped form your musical tastes but might be considered a little, well, weird by your contemporaries. Maybe they were your parents' records? Those younger than me (and such an exercise can *really* date you!) might have Gord as such an influence--but that wouldn't be embarrassing, like some of mine!



------------------
Born once - Got it right the first time. )O(
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2003, 05:43 PM   #15
violet Blue Horse
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

The most embarassing one on the list is Rod McKuen. I still own those albums, and yes, ahem, some books. The other two would be Dylan and Charlie Rich. Charlie Rich created a life long affinity for a good blues piano riff, and his phrasing has never left me. It's still there when I sing in the shower. Dylan taught me to appreciate a well written lyric. Don't ask me what Rod McKuen taught me. I'm still trying to figure that out. Though he does have a way with putting lyrics and music together.


[QUOTE]Originally posted by MaryEllen:
[B]OK, after several months posting on this board, here's my first topic--be kind!

It was suggested by Oma, Gwen, Brink, Cathy, Auburn Annie, and Borderstone's reminiscences in the "Celebration" thread. Got me to thinking about all the (often ridiculous) music you listen to while growing up. I think this subject deserves its own thread. What would be your early musical influences?

I don't mean pop or rock or stuff like kiddie records. I mean things that really helped form your musical tastes but might be considered a little, well, weird by your contemporaries. Maybe they were your parents' records? Those younger than me (and such an exercise can *really* date you!) might have Gord as such an influence--but that wouldn't be embarrassing, like some of mine!



------------------
Born once - Got it right the first time. )O(
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2003, 10:37 PM   #16
Brian 57
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Utica NY USA
Posts: 224
Default

OK, the trip down memory lane-- anybody else want to admit to these?

"Hocus Pocus" by the band Focus

Deodato's rock version of "Also Sprach Zarathrusta" (the 2001 A Space Odyessy theme)

"Toccata and Funk in D minor"-- a real piece of "Classical" rock with a Bach beat.

The sound track from West Side Story (my Dad's copy)

Andy Williams (my sister would fall asleep to his records)

Walter Carlos's "Well Tempered Synthesizer"-- a follow up to "Switched on Bach" (Walter Carlos put a switch on himself when he became Wendy Carlos, so it's weird to his/her stuff now)

Tenesee Ernie Ford's "Sixteen Tons"

The Lawrence Welk show

Perry Como

Spike Jones


"Inna Gada Da Vida" by Iron Butterfly (I still remember parts of the 17 minute drum solo)

Eddie Arnold

"Smoke on the Water"

Big band music

Tin Pan Alley songs ("Who's sorry now", etc.)

Sing Along with Mitch

Anything and everything on AM rock n roll in the 60s and 70s.

That's all I can think of now. It's a mix, but then so am I.

Brian 57 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2003, 10:39 PM   #17
fowlesjohn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: NJ USA
Posts: 310
Default

Mary Ellen,
You did bring in a good topic.
As I have mentioned music was our life ffrom a very young age my father was always playing his guitar (martin d series from a long time ago). He was quite enarmored of bluegrass, any kind, I am a product of that background and so bluegrass just fills something in my soul. My mother loved big band music. They both taught us to enjoy all music forms and I do. Sometimes against the ideas of others....but, for me there really is no bad music or untolerable music. Even the polkas are great, Lawrence Welk is fine,
None I can think of that would be awful, really. When I had heard Gord's music my father was playing an album one day, it must have been the two tones, and I said "who is that?" My father said "Gord Lightfoot." I said "nuh uh." and my mother said "yes it is". I persisted with my inability to see Gord, who I knew from EMR, IYCRMM and Sundown (what I considered cool) as capable of these extremely folkie songs, some where between that yesterday and what is I found tolerance for all music.
Good topic. We are who we are.
GSS
fowlesjohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2003, 10:39 PM   #18
gwen snyder
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 569
Default

Mary Ellen,
You did bring in a good topic.
As I have mentioned music was our life ffrom a very young age my father was always playing his guitar (martin d series from a long time ago). He was quite enarmored of bluegrass, any kind, I am a product of that background and so bluegrass just fills something in my soul. My mother loved big band music. They both taught us to enjoy all music forms and I do. Sometimes against the ideas of others....but, for me there really is no bad music or untolerable music. Even the polkas are great, Lawrence Welk is fine,
None I can think of that would be awful, really. When I had heard Gord's music my father was playing an album one day, it must have been the two tones, and I said "who is that?" My father said "Gord Lightfoot." I said "nuh uh." and my mother said "yes it is". I persisted with my inability to see Gord, who I knew from EMR, IYCRMM and Sundown (what I considered cool) as capable of these extremely folkie songs, some where between that yesterday and what is I found tolerance for all music.
Good topic. We are who we are.
GSS
gwen snyder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2003, 04:20 AM   #19
Iron
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Central, Pa. U.S.
Posts: 354
Default

Great idea,thanks to my Mom,Elvis has to be my earliest I can recall ,and then anything that was on the radio until........bum bum....bum bum bum bum bum bum..bum been addicted ever since...
Iron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2003, 12:36 PM   #20
macjames
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 18
Default

Hum!

Music that my mom used to play was:
Barry White
All things Elvis
Lots of motown

My dad:
Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson
Johnny Cash
Hank Sr
Polka music
All the Cb records that came out in the 70's

My older sisters:
David Cassidy
Jackson 5
Disco Duck(which my sister still has and I still get a laugh out of that)
The muppets christmas
Bay City Rollers

Just to name a few


macjames is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2003, 12:36 PM   #21
christinefrommichigan
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: howell,michigan
Posts: 37
Send a message via AIM to christinefrommichigan
Default

Hum!

Music that my mom used to play was:
Barry White
All things Elvis
Lots of motown

My dad:
Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson
Johnny Cash
Hank Sr
Polka music
All the Cb records that came out in the 70's

My older sisters:
David Cassidy
Jackson 5
Disco Duck(which my sister still has and I still get a laugh out of that)
The muppets christmas
Bay City Rollers

Just to name a few


christinefrommichigan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2003, 04:42 PM   #22
Borderstone
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Phoenix,Arizona -America
Posts: 4,431
Default

To Brian 57:Hey,what's wrong with Perry Como? Mitch Miller? Deodato? etc. I have no trouble admitting what I like. I actually have Deodato's Album that the song is from. He's pretty good! As for Mitch,did you know he's still around? Yep! He's turning 92 this July and he'll be 100 in 2011! (I really don't wanna think about that year just now.) I think the days of having to be embarrased by your musical tastes are long gone,if anyone has a problem with it,then they must not have much of a life. So,rock on,waltz on,hip-hop on,disco on,Pat Boone on with ya bad self! It's been the B! Catch ya on the flipside of Sundown!

------------------
Borderstone
Borderstone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2003, 12:36 AM   #23
Iron
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Central, Pa. U.S.
Posts: 354
Default

Can not forget Merle,still get a Hag attack from time to time. Those Ramblin riffs and Muskogee Okie's and Marty's chest pains.And that one,I cannot recall the artist or song title,and this was very early for me ,it went -and you can tell the man to turn the jukebox way down low ,and you can tell your friend there with you...he'll have to go... Anyone figured out the bum bum? Iron
Iron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2003, 10:33 AM   #24
Tyler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Manchester, England
Posts: 595
Default

Iron
That would be whispering Jim Reeves.

[This message has been edited by brink (edited May 17, 2003).]
Tyler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2003, 10:33 AM   #25
brink
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: USA
Posts: 1,388
Default

Iron
That would be whispering Jim Reeves.

[This message has been edited by brink (edited May 17, 2003).]
brink is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Musical Notes DMD3 General Discussion 14 07-18-2003 10:52 AM
Gord's musical nephew SomewhereupinMichigan General Discussion 14 01-14-2003 11:45 AM
LIGHTFOOT - The Musical char General Discussion 1 02-12-2002 03:13 PM
Influences on Artists Gord General Discussion 1 10-13-2001 03:35 AM
Influences to and from Gord Dorothea General Discussion 3 09-19-2000 11:42 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
downleft 1x1.gif (807 Byte) downright