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Old 07-31-2007, 08:22 AM   #1
Auburn Annie
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MSNBC had an article on two new pieces of equipment to make copying old VHS tapes or vinyl albums without hassle. See this link: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20039078/

Here's the information re copying your old albums:

-----------------------------------------------

One-touch vinyl/cassette rescue

Since we’re in the mood to make things incredibly easy, let’s talk about rescuing all of your old records and cassettes. They’re in danger, too. Heat, dust, moisture, and toddlers can all contribute to their destruction. And some records were recorded many years ago and were never converted by the record company into CD format.

The Crosley company, which has been around for decades, makes two record player/recorders that easily and quickly record all of your old discs and tapes directly to a CD. Or, if you prefer, directly to your computer. Voilá – you are your own record publisher.

The Songwriter CR248 ($399) records directly to the CD — just put your old record or tape in the player, press the “CD Record” button, and the Songwriter will burn you a CD, in real time. If you want to record the CD with separate tracks (so you can fast-forward or rewind, just like on a standard CD) press the “Split Track” button in between songs..

The Songwriter CR249 is less expensive ($149) than the 248 above, because there is no CD player in it. Instead, Crosley put a USB cable on the back of the 249 player which, with the included software, lets you record your records and tapes directly to the computer.

And both record players work with all standard vinyl formats — 33 1/3, 45 and 78 rpm records, as well as 7”, 10” and 12” discs.

Time to pull out that old “Jerry and the Coconuts” album and rock out.
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Old 07-31-2007, 06:26 PM   #2
talbot10
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HI Annie! Thanks for that info.
That is great to know.
Bill
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..*you will always have your time to shine, even in the winter of your darkest hour*...jeremy enigk -Website: billhall.us
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Old 08-01-2007, 12:00 AM   #3
podunklander
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The Crosley Songwriter products are a great option/supplement. So nice to see this information passed along, Annie!

I've had some discussions with people who have used these. Most people are satisfied with the reproduced sound. But then there are those who adhere to the school of thought that the quality produced by any digital method is no match.

Also, the permanence of CD's should be considered. Thought I'd pass along this website:

http://www.chin.gc.ca/English/Digita...ons/media.html

Here, you will find some great links for resources/references pertaining to the preservation of digital storage devices and issues regarding reading devices.

In regards to the latter...something most of us wouldn't even think twice about! I encourage everyone to read up on this.

It really isn't known how long CD's will 'last', but studies do show that the same conditions that adversely affect other recording materials (cassette tapes, records)also do so with CD's.

Some simple measures for extending the life of a CD are proper cleaning and handling techniques.

Don't know if this is mentioned in any of the links...but I've also seen it recommended that jewel cases be replaced every year or two. Also, the cases do have vents to allow for air flow so wherever and however you store the CD's...should allow for some air flow into these vents. Of course, there can be particles and moisture in the air so all conditions need to be taken into consideration.

Many people stock up on blank CD's and thus may be using a poorer/compromised quality material to record on. Best to use newly manufactured CD's. If you burn a CD that's already 5 years old...

Not only for music recordings...but if you are storing photos on a CD, again make sure to use fresh CD's and record the date that the CD was burned. Plan on burning a new CD by about 5 years (less than 5 if used/handled and if it's been subjected to an environment where relative humidity hasn't been maintained).

Pam
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