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Old 09-21-2013, 10:03 PM   #1
charlene
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Default Neil Young sings EMR@FarmAid 2013&IYCRMM-3-2014

@ 5:07 - http://www.youtube.com/user/farmaid

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Old 09-21-2013, 10:12 PM   #2
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Default Re: Neil Young sings EMR @ Farm Aid 2013

after that he sings CHANGES ....
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Old 01-17-2014, 05:12 PM   #3
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Default Re: Neil Young sings EMR @ Farm Aid 2013

http://www.nicholasjennings.com/blog...vers-lightfoot

Neil Young covers Lightfoot
WRITTEN BY NICHOLAS JENNINGS PDF Print E-mail

Neil Young is the latest artist to cover Gordon Lightfoot's 1966 classic "Early Morning Rain." He recorded the song at the Farm Aid concert in Saratoga Springs, NY on September 21, 2013. It's one of Lightfoot fans' most beloved compositions. Lightfoot wrote the song, which includes the memorable line "you can't jump a jet plane, like you can a freight train," based on his memories of living in Los Angeles as a music student and watching "big 707" jetliners taking off from LAX.

Now Young is recording "Early Morning Rain" as part of a new album of cover songs for Jack White's Third Man Records and will likely be released by Warner Bros, as well.

In December 2013, the Neil Young website Thrasher’s Wheat quoted a source as saying: “It is an album of covers. In it, as anticipated, he pays tribute to other renowned singer-songwriters. There are 12 tracks on it. There are no Neil Young originals…”

Other songs likely to be included are Bert Jansch's “Needle of Death,” as well as Phil Ochs “Changes” Bob Dylan’s “Blowin’ in the Wind,” Ivory Joe Hunter’s “Since I Met You Baby” and Tim Hardin’s “Reason To Believe,” all songs that Young played at the 2013 Farm Aid concert.

With "Early Morning Rain," Young joins a long list of artists who have covered Lightfoot's classic, including: Harry Belafonte, Eva Cassidy, Judy Collins, Bob Dylan, Grateful Dead, George Hamilton IV, Ronnie Hawkins, Richard Hawley, Ian & Sylvia, Kingston Trio, Jerry Lee Lewis, Tommy Makem & The Clancy Brothers, Raul Malo, Peter, Paul & Mary, Elvis Presley, Jerry Reed, Tony Rice, Porter Wagoner, Paul Weller and Josh White Jr.
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Old 03-30-2014, 06:00 PM   #4
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Default Re: Neil Young sings EMR @ Farm Aid 2013

IYCRMM- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b05kRWbMIEU
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Old 03-30-2014, 07:32 PM   #5
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Default Re: Neil Young sings EMR@FarmAid 2013&IYCRMM-3-2014

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment...#axzz2xUXPvh7K

By Randy Lewis
March 30, 2014, 11:36 a.m.

It wasn’t a big leap to wonder during Saturday’s opening night of Neil Young’s four-night run of solo acoustic concerts in Hollywood whether Jesus, if he returned to address a modern-day audience, would have to contend with a steady stream of shouts from the back for “Sermon on the Mount!” “Water into wine!” and “Free Bird!”
Young fielded a similar barrage of requests ("Cinnamon Girl!" "Down By the River!") and comments ("You're the man!") from the sold-out crowd at the Dolby Theatre good-naturedly.

At one point he tacitly acknowledged the tone of almost spiritual pilgrimage in the air by shaking the water out of a harmonica onto folks sitting in the first few rows, a rock ’n’ roll priest anointing his flock. He even shifted into request mode himself after another outburst from fans, mock shouting “The Beatles!” “The Rolling Stoooooones!” “Free Bird!”

For Young, too, there seems to be a ritualistic aspect of his periodic return to the solo acoustic format of his live shows, alternating with high-decibel sessions with Crazy Horse or the various other settings he’s explored over what’s fast approaching a half-century career. It’s as if it reconnects him with the musical and spiritual foundation of his art, stripping the process back to its fundamental components of one person, one instrument and a muse.
Without a word of introduction, Young sauntered on stage, grabbed a guitar and — as he did at Carnegie Hall in January — delivered his theme statement in the form of the song “From Hank to Hendrix” from his 1992 album “Harvest Moon”:
From Hank to Hendrix
I walked these streets with you
Here I am with this old guitar
Doin’ what I do
The 2½-hour show, which included a 30-minute intermission, stretched across his career, hewing closely to the songs he’d played in New York, yet still brimming with his signature sense of spontaneity, of mercurial artistry alive in the moment, that makes Young such a hallowed figure to so many. It’s the same kind of show Jonathan Demme documented in the 2012 concert film “Neil Young Journeys.”

Most facets of a multifaceted career were represented, from Buffalo Springfield (“Mr. Soul,” “On the Way Home” and “Flying On the Ground is Wrong”) to Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young (“Ohio”) to the solo efforts that have occupied the bulk of his attention through his adult life. He dropped in a few relative rarities, including “Mellow My Mind” from “Tonight’s the Night,” for which he grabbed the nearby banjo, and “Philadelphia,”

But there also were plenty of cornerstone songs, including “Southern Man,” “Old Man” and “After the Gold Rush” as well as an ambitious reworking of “A Man Needs a Maid” for which he replaced the original symphony orchestra portions of the arrangement with keyboard synthesizer.
He even made room to salute a couple of other songwriters he admires, delivering Phil Ochs’ “Changes” and “If You Could Read My Mind” by fellow Canadian Gordon Lightfoot, both of whom he’d also saluted last fall during an abbreviated benefit performance in L.A. for the Silverlake Conservatory.

The words that cropped up most over the course of nearly two dozen songs were “love” and “change,” topics that have expressed themselves in myriad ways through one of the most dynamic careers in rock music.
As he’s done periodically over the decades, Young brought to the stage an arsenal of instruments with which he could indulge any whim — a phalanx of acoustic guitars, a baby grand piano and an upright bookending the semi-circular layout, his vintage pump organ perched on a platform at the back of the stage. Watching over all was “Woody,” the cigar-store wooden Indian that’s been Young’s silent companion on stage and off for ages.

“Woody doesn’t like me talking about him,” Young, 68, said with a wry smile late in the evening. Sporting a black fedora, gray-green long-sleeve shirt over a black T-shirt and cream-colored chinos, Young came slightly more upscale than his standard plaid flannel shirt and blue denim jeans.

He shared stories about several of the guitars he’d brought along — one given to him by longtime friend and collaborator Stephen Stills, another he said he bought in a music store in Nashville only to discover later it had once belonged to Hank Williams. As has long been the case, especially in Young’s solo shows, the sonics were virtually flawless, projecting all the richly nuanced character of his craggy voice and the lushness of his evocative but unfussy guitar work.

As a career retrospective, Saturday’s concert left little wanting, except on the question of where Young is in terms of adding to the imposing songbook he’s already created. In his “Waging Heavy Peace” book in 2012, he noted that the creative spark for his songwriting had been hard to conjure since he decided to give up smoking pot.
Although he did craft a batch of new songs for 2012’s “Psychedelic Pill” album with Crazy Horse, those were more notable for the instrumental interplay with his longtime jam pals than for their lyric insights or poetic beauty. As he put it in the book, “I’ll get back to you on that.”
Young's run at the Dolby continues with shows Sunday night, Monday and Tuesday. All are sold out.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment...#ixzz2xUYV7oQG
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Old 03-30-2014, 10:11 PM   #6
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Default Re: Neil Young sings EMR@FarmAid 2013&IYCRMM-3-2014

Nice job on both songs. Neil definitely did them justice.

I don't know if Mr. Lightfoot has ever covered Neil Young, but it would be interesting to hear his take on something like "Long May You Run"
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Old 04-03-2014, 06:01 PM   #7
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Default Re: Neil Young sings EMR@FarmAid 2013&IYCRMM-3-2014

http://www.stereogum.com/1673492/wat...llywood/video/
Over the weekend, during a show at Hollywood’s Dolby Theater, Neil Young covered fellow Canadian legend Gordon Lightfoot’s deathless 1970 breakup song “If You Could Read My Mind.” It was Young’s first time playing the song live, and he played it as a tremulous acoustic hymn. His version, in fact, was not too terribly distant from the reading that Johnny Cash gave the same song on his posthumous American V: A Hundred Highways. Uncut speculates that Young’s decision to play “If You Could Read My Mind” live means that it’s probably one of the songs on his forthcoming all-covers album A Letter Home. We will see.At his Hollywood shows, Young also played “Thrasher” live for the first time in 36 years.
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Old 04-04-2014, 12:08 PM   #8
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Default Re: Neil Young sings EMR@FarmAid 2013&IYCRMM-3-2014

Reference Bert Jansch's “Needle of Death,” I recently watched a TV program "The genius of Bert Jansch. In it Neil Young recorded the song hunched in a small recording booth with guitar. It was quite interesting. Looked a little uncomfortable.

Last edited by Jim Nasium; 04-07-2014 at 03:30 PM.
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Old 04-04-2014, 12:59 PM   #9
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Default Re: Neil Young sings EMR@FarmAid 2013&IYCRMM-3-2014

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Nasium View Post
Reference Bert Jansch's “Needle of Death,” I recently watched a TV program "The genius of Bert Jansch. In it Neil Young recorded the song hunched in a small recording booth with guitar. It was quite interesting. Looked a little uncomfortable. If the link bellow works, scoot forward to 12 mins. It will only be available for a few days.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode...es_and_Beyond/
good Gym North American viewers will see this get stuffed message!!
Currently BBC iPlayer TV programmes are available to play in the UK only, but all BBC iPlayer Radio programmes are available to you. why?
If you are in the UK and see this message please read this advice
Go to the BBC iPlayer Radio homepage
I do know that it is possible to fool the system by getting a "proxy" program that tells the Beeb's site that you are not in North America but in Hicksville UK.
I installed one once but it came with malware and/or annoying home page hijacking by an undesirable search engine
plus it is possible to do the same thing in reverse so that restricted North American material can be watched in the UK
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Old 04-04-2014, 03:06 PM   #10
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Default Re: Neil Young sings EMR@FarmAid 2013&IYCRMM-3-2014

http://adamjansch.co.uk/

I wonder if this guy might be able to help you with that. I don't know.
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Old 04-05-2014, 08:06 AM   #11
Jim Nasium
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Default Re: Neil Young sings EMR@FarmAid 2013&IYCRMM-3-2014

John, I'm in Hicksville UK. When I listen to BBC Radio 2 here in the UK, I here the presenter tell us he has a text from Dogsville Ohio, saying "Enjoying the program here in Dogsville" How do they pick up BBC programs?
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Old 04-05-2014, 12:47 PM   #12
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Default Re: Neil Young sings EMR@FarmAid 2013&IYCRMM-3-2014

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Nasium View Post
John, I'm in Hicksville UK. When I listen to BBC Radio 2 here in the UK, I here the presenter tell us he has a text from Dogsville Ohio, saying "Enjoying the program here in Dogsville" How do they pick up BBC programs?
Ah ha an easy one that is the difference between BBC Radio which is not restricted in any way and can be heard by everybody on the internet everywhere without paying any corporation for a licence and BBC television
the "why?" in my quote was a link too
http://iplayerhelp.external.bbc.co.u...e_uk/outsideuk

Can I use BBC iPlayer outside the UK?
Rights agreements mean that BBC iPlayer television programmes are only available to users to download or stream (Click to Play) in the UK. However, we are aware of demand for an international version. BBC Worldwide has recently launched the BBC iPlayer App for iPad and iPhone in various countries. Visit the BBC IPlayer (Global) YouTube channel for further information.
Most radio programmes are available outside the UK in addition to
podcasts, although sporting and other programmes may be subject to rights agreements.
In addition, highlights from many of BBC News' programmes are available for viewers outside the UK, as is BBC Sport video content.
Do make sure you check for the latest updates on BBC iPlayer or contact your own country's broadcasters to find out if they offer a similar service to BBC iPlayer
As said a similar reason applies to the reverse
so you in Hicksville can listen to the sophistication of radio broadcasts from New York (including inane Geico adverts) or Toronto but might have trouble watching their television on line
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Old 04-07-2014, 03:31 PM   #13
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Default Re: Neil Young sings EMR@FarmAid 2013&IYCRMM-3-2014

Thank you, John, very informative. I have just removed the link from my post, as it has expired.
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Old 04-09-2014, 09:45 AM   #14
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Default Re: Neil Young sings EMR@FarmAid 2013&IYCRMM-3-2014

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Nasium View Post
Reference Bert Jansch's “Needle of Death,” I recently watched a TV program "The genius of Bert Jansch. In it Neil Young recorded the song hunched in a small recording booth with guitar. It was quite interesting. Looked a little uncomfortable.
I wish I would have seen that. I enjoy their music. Was watching Pentangle videos the other night, and have a nice dvd collection of travelling songs 1967-1996 and In Session friday november 21 2003, and a cd of Bert Jansch, and the Pentangle cd, a basket of light. I like to sing like jacqui.

Bert Jansch / Needle Of Death - YouTube

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Old 04-18-2014, 09:28 AM   #15
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http://popcultureblog.dallasnews.com...ard-time.html/

Neil Young gave his ‘Heart’ and ‘Soul’ Thursday, and some folks just gave him a hard time.

I would love to share with you the story Neil Young told Thursday night about his Martin D-28, which once belonged to Hank Williams and shared the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center stage with him on what was for the most part a very special night.

But I can’t, because Young wasn’t allowed the opportunity to share the tale. He tried. He held “Hank” in his hands and began recalling that trip to Nashville, when, from the balcony, to Young’s left, a man began shouting: “Play it! Play it!” At which point the 68-year-old who’s been making music since high school reminded the crowd that no one tells Neil Young what to do.

“I don’t think I’m gonna play it,” he said. Beneath his black wide-brimmed hat, he grinned a little. But you could tell: He was not pleased. The heckling continued, because this is just what some people do: spend hundreds of dollars to see their heroes, only to steal their spotlight.

“What, do I work?” Young said, the good humor now completely gone from his voice. “Is this a job? I’m trying to recall the last time I did something expressly because someone told me to do it.” The rest of the crowd cheered, almost as though it were trying to distract Young or jolt him back into the jovial mood he’d been in moments earlier, following a version of “Mr. Soul” played on a pump organ. Instead he just played the next song: “Harvest Moon,” one of the more beautiful entries in a canon filled with tenderhearted melodies. But Young strummed the guitar a little harder than usual, and didn’t so much sing its simple, sentimental lyrics (“When we were lovers/I loved you with all my heart”) as he did spit them out.

And when it was done, even Young seemed taken aback by the performance. “Funny — that song is not supposed to be angry,” he said, almost to himself. “There was a little anger in that one.” Then, glaring toward the balcony, he said to his heckler, “You get what you demand.”

This has been the refrain throughout this solo sojourn, which began at Carnegie Hall in January and stopped at Los Angeles’ Dolby Theater last month: Neil Young is a guest in the audience’s house, and not the other way around. He gives the crowd exactly what it wants: gorgeous, stripped-down versions of beloved songs, among them the oft-covered “Only Love Can Break Your Heart,” “Mr. Soul,” “Mellow My Mind,” “Heart of Gold” (“my hit,” Young called it), “Pocahontas,” “After the Gold Rush,” “Thrasher” and a particularly wrenching “Old Man” in which the roles have been reversed. And he is repaid in heckles and commands.

It doesn’t ruin the occasion; little could. But it is embarrassing. Neil Young really doesn’t need you to tell him what to play or that he rocks.

Young, at 68, still sounds as has since the very beginning: His voice is high, sweet, gentle, cracked like soft leather even when snarling through a version of “Ohio” nearly marred by some audience members’ clumsy clapalong. The man who roars when riding a Crazy Horse sings like an angel when seated behind one of his two pianos or strumming one of the eight guitars with which he surrounded himself. His take on Gordon Lightfoot’s “If You Could Read My Mind,” now a set regular, rescues it from the soft-rock abyss; it sounds like one of Young’s own offerings. So too does his version of Phil Ochs’ “Changes,” which Young said Thursday night served as the template for much of his own work.

He was actually in a merry mood for most of the night. Young told elliptical tales about catching snapping turtles in the old mill stream when he was 5. He shared a story about Pete Seeger and an unnamed folk singer booed off the Carnegie Hall stage for wearing a gold lamé jacket. He marveled at the Meyerson, where he’d played in 2010. (Four years ago, he said, the venue “blew my mind.”) He knocked the Coen Brothers’ film Inside Llewyn Davis for being untruthful. And he offered a close-to-best-of set like a man who still enjoys singing songs written several lifetimes ago.

He also put up with the audience’s nonsense, but only for so long, excising from the set a few songs he’s played elsewhere. And why should he pardon the interruptions? He’s Neil Young. And he doesn’t work. He plays — better than almost anyone ever, even when you’re shouting at him. But if you’re going Friday night, one favor: don’t. Just don’t.
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