banner.gif (3613 Byte)

Corner.gif 1x1.gif Corner.gif
1x1.gif You are at: Home - Discussion Forum 1x1.gif
Corner.gif 1x1.gif Corner.gif
      
round_corner_upleft.gif (837 Byte) 1x1.gif (807 Byte) round_corner_upright.gif (837 Byte)

Go Back   Gordon Lightfoot Forums > Small Talk

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10-10-2019, 11:24 AM   #1
charlene
Moderator
 
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 15,369
Default KRISTOFFERSON review - Australia

https://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/ch...past-his-prime
Kris Kristofferson a real star, but past his prime
Patrick Shepherd
07:08, Oct 10 2019

"It felt good being in the company of a real star, definitely quality but also past their prime," Stuff's reviewer says of Kris Kristofferson performance in Christchurch on Wednesday.

"It felt good being in the company of a real star, definitely quality but also past their prime," Stuff's reviewer says of Kris Kristofferson performance in Christchurch on Wednesday.
Kris Kristofferson and the Strangers
Douglas Lilburn Auditorium
Christchurch Town Hall, October 9.

REVIEW: I am much more familiar with Kris Kristofferson's acting work than his music but there were plenty in this impressive and enthusiastic crowd who were obviously devotees.

The shouts of encouragement and the occasional brave dancers signalled that he was amongst friends who were ready to relive their younger days all over again.

That is a great thing to see from any performer and I doubt if any fans left the Christchurch Town Hall feeling anything but total admiration for this 83-year-old performer prepared to go back on the road to do it all again for his faithful followers.

Not being into country music puts me at a deficit before I even set foot in the place but I can still recognise a good gig when I'm in one and I have to say that the reception Kristofferson got from the sizeable crowd was warm and very appreciative.

I enjoyed it in the same way I did Bob Dylan – it felt good being in the company of a real star, definitely quality but also past their prime.

I found even the up-tempo numbers fairly ponderous and in need of an injection of energy, just about making it to the finish line.

The members of Merle Haggard's band the Strangers tried moving it forward, especially the vocalist/violinist who took on some of the heavier lifting vocally and provided some quicker ideas to the mix on the fiddle.

Kristofferson kept going for almost two hours, so value for money for sure, but the similitude of the songs, their delivery and lack of stylistic variation got a bit wearing.

Many would disagree strongly so that's where our opinions will part.

Kristofferson went through most of the songs he is known for, such as For the Good Times, Me and Bobby Magee and Help Me Make It Through the Night with his trademark cowboy drawl but there were plenty of other crowd favourites, such as Casey's Last Ride, Sunday Morning Coming Down and the old Haggard classic Okie from Muskogee.
charlene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2019, 11:41 AM   #2
charlene
Moderator
 
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 15,369
Default Re: KRISTOFFERSON review - Australia

https://www.thebigsmoke.com.au/2019/...kristofferson/

Reflections on witnessing the final performances of Sinatra, Pavarotti and Kristofferson
1 DAY AGO
DERRYN HINCH

It’s that show biz moment that people, of a certain age, really dread. You’ve bought expensive tickets to see the musical superstar you have revered for eons. A famous international singer, who is still out there working the antipodes and clubs, and you painfully discover, they should have buried their microphone years ago.

(Just think of a fat, sweaty Elvis, squeezed into a spangled white jumpsuit, struggling with the words of a Presley classic).

I thought I was up for such an experience recently when I read Kris Kristofferson was coming to Australia, I knew I had to be there.

Why? About 20 years ago, a journo asked me if ever there was a movie made about my life who would I want to play me. I said: Kris Kristofferson. The Rhodes scholar, who swept the studio floors in Nashville before becoming a star, who wrote songs like Me and Bobby McGee and Sunday Morning Comin’ Down and the haunting Darby’s Castle and my favourite – Just the Other Side of Nowhere. And who starred with Barbra Streisand in the third version of A Star Is Born.

I read that Kristofferson was booked to appear at the 100-only Saddles restaurant owned by John Singleton at Mt. White, near Gosford, NSW. So, I phoned the man who once sacked me from 2GB in Sydney, and invited myself.

Several days later I started having real doubts. Is this wise, as my ex-mother-in-law used to say. I saw a video of Kristofferson performing in Canberra. I didn’t realise he was 83. He was singing Help me make it through the night. I didn’t think he would make it through the song.

The day arrived for Saddles and the early word was not good. At 2.20, the star was still asleep in his van. But, at 2.30 on the dot, he strolled on stage. No loud backup team of pretty female singers to distract and disguise any weaknesses. Just one male with a violin, a drummer with brushes and snare drum, and a subtle keyboard player.

Kris Kristofferson played for two hours with just one ten-minute break. Talk about a star is re-born, in my mind. It was fabulous. What a privilege.

It reminded me though of times when there was no such redemption.

Decades ago, I went to Las Vegas to see Frank Sinatra at Caesar’s Palace. As one does. Unfortunately, the night before, Sinatra had had a bad night on the gambling tables and been refused extra credit. He responded by punching a croupier and then driving a golf cart into the switchboard area which caught on fire.

Sinatra’s performances were cancelled. But, good news, his spot would be filled by Friends of Frank. The early show before ours starred Sammy Davis Jr. We were to get Dean Martin. And we did, sort of. Martin, who made a comic career out of pretending to be drunk, appeared on stage and he was drunk. He even forgot the words to his greatest hit O Mein Papa.

At the time, Martin was married to actress Connie Stevens. She was sitting just in front of me. Not for long. She walked out in disgust. As I headed up the aisle, I was jostled by a man coming the other way. It was a staggering Dean Martin, shouting “Wheresh Connie? Wheresh Connie?”



Decades ago, I went to Las Vegas to see Frank Sinatra at Caesar’s Palace. As one does. Unfortunately, the night before, Sinatra had had a bad night on the gambling tables and been refused extra credit. He responded by punching a croupier and then driving a golf cart into the switchboard area which caught on fire.

Speaking of Vegas, the singer who probably appeared there more than anybody, and who made millions, was Wayne Newton. He then did a final world tour and washed up in Australia. Friends went and were appalled. He could barely sing apparently and was propped up by a wall of back-up singers.

And then there was Luciano Pavarotti. I am not a real opera fan. The lead singers take far too long to die. But this was Pavarotti’s farewell tour and a showbiz contact gave me two $1300 tickets to the god-like, much-anticipated, appearance at the MCG. We left at the interval. Or “half-time”, seeing we were at the G.

Pavarotti had an amazing female co-star who sat, respectfully, downstage from him and sang like a bird. But el supremo could hardly hold himself on his stool, let alone hold a note. And he spent most of the time brandishing a huge white handkerchief and wiping copious amounts of sweat off his flushed face.

Which shows the class of one Linda Ronstadt. The singer of such great songs as Desperado, Just one look, When will I be loved and You’re no good decided she was no longer any good, and quit singing. Acknowledged her voice was no longer what it had been and walked away.

For me, that left a positive memory. We had watched her at the Arts Centre in Melbourne singing with Nelson Riddle and his orchestra. Linda finished without singing one of her biggest hits.

For an encore, she casually walked in front of the curtain and, acappella, sang Desperado. It was stunning.
charlene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2019, 08:57 AM   #3
Dave, Melbourne,Australia
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 486
Default Re: KRISTOFFERSON review - Australia

Char,

Those reviews from Christchurch (New Zealand) and Mt White (Australia) were very interesting. The writer of the Australian article, Derryn Hinch, is a well-known TV-radio-newspaper journalist who recently got elected to Parliament. He obviously had disappointing memories of Pavarotti (performing at the Melbourne Cricket Ground) and Sinatra etc, but good memories of Kristofferson and Linda Ronstadt. I was at that Ronstadt/Nelson Riddle concert when she finished with "Desperado". I was also at her Feb1979 concert at the MCG, which I understand was the first stadium concert anywhere in the world by a female act.
Dave, Melbourne,Australia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2019, 08:41 PM   #4
Don Quixote
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Springfield, MA 01109
Posts: 312
Default Re: KRISTOFFERSON review - Australia

Sorry, but I'm calling at least a bit of B.S. Dean Martin was never married to Connie Stevens, and his "drunk act" was really an act. Also, "Oh! My Papa" was not his big hit. He may be getting mixed up with Eddie Fisher, who was married to Connie Stevens and did sing that song. How you could get Martin and Fisher mixed up is beyond me. I'm not sure if this calls into question the veracity of the other "reporting."
Don Quixote is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
downleft 1x1.gif (807 Byte) downright