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Old 05-13-2001, 12:19 PM   #1
Cathy
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I've been a lightfoot fan, since 1966, when I was stationed in Alaska. I've been a performer of other people's songs for most of my adult life, Mr. Lightfoot's included. One of his early songs,"Black Day in July" , is to put it simply, the most complete package that I've ever heard;writing,mixing, vocals and instruments, especially rymthmically. My question is, What year did the Detroit riots happen?


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joe beckey
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Old 05-13-2001, 12:19 PM   #2
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I've been a lightfoot fan, since 1966, when I was stationed in Alaska. I've been a performer of other people's songs for most of my adult life, Mr. Lightfoot's included. One of his early songs,"Black Day in July" , is to put it simply, the most complete package that I've ever heard;writing,mixing, vocals and instruments, especially rymthmically. My question is, What year did the Detroit riots happen?


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joe beckey
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Old 05-13-2001, 04:32 PM   #3
rainydayperson
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Here your are (from author Kevin Holloway):


The Detroit Riot

During the summer of 1967, violence rocked the city of my birth place. Although 30 years removed, I vividly recall the events of this deadly riot. It was a Sunday afternoon on Grand River avenue near Outer Drive. The vast majority of the stores were closed as was usual on a Sunday afternoon in 1967. A few of the major stores, such as Sears and Federals, were in fact open and did have security guards at hand. The smaller stores, however, were closed and ripe for the pickings.

Early this Sunday morning, the police raided a Black club on 12th street, which was in fact miles away. Apparently, there were more patrons than the police expected and things got a little out of hand. In a matter of hours, word spread of police brutality in the arrests. In a matter of hours, all hell broke loose.

While the city was exploding in violence, several friends and I were watching a movie at the Beverly Theater. Suddenly, the lights came on and mothers streamed down the isles. I looked up and there was my mother. "There's a riot going on", she shouted. At the age of 10, I didn't have the slightest idea what she was talking about. However, as we walked outside the theater, the streets were filled with looters and I quickly learned the meaning of riot. People were running to and from stores with all sorts of merchandise in their arms. I had never seen so many people in this area at one time.

As we drove East down Grand River, while weaving through the crowds of looters, I saw cars with chains attached to their bumpers pulling the security gates off the front of stores. Several businesses simply had cars driven right through the front door for entry into the stores. The ingenuity was truly amazing as these looters worked in unison to loot and pillage businesses that were the life blood of their own community. Not one store in our community was spared.

Many looters looked for places to stash their goods. Most of the parents on my street would not tolerate this sort of behavior. One of my friends and I observed someone driving in the alley behind our house. When we investigated the area, we found several stolen items hidden behind some bushes. We took the items down the alley and hid them behind some other bushes. But after telling my next door neighbors, they went out to the alley, grabbed the items, and brought them into their home. This would be looter was obviously a little surprised when he returned. My friends and I then went down the street to see if the stores on the corner of Northfield and Joy Road had been hit. Sure enough, looters were running from the stores with arms full. The police stood by in their cars doing absolutely nothing. I suppose they figured there were so many people that their efforts would be in vein. Perhaps they were there simply to prevent fires. It didn't matter, the grocery store, cleaners, and other businesses there were burned that very same night.

During most of the day, the neighbors and I sat on our porches and watched the billowing clouds of smoke as one Black business after and another was burned to the ground. We marveled at how ferocious the fires had been, observing the thickness of the smoke and the intensity of the flames to the left and then right, anticipating what would go next. Some fires were put out immediately, but snipers began shooting at the fireman. Helicopters flew around the neighborhoods looking for snipers. The thick foliage over many streets, however, shielded them from their view. The snipers had little regard for human life, especially for these firemen who were all White. At night, residents were ordered to keep all lights off and there was a dusk to dawn curfew. Shots rang out throughout the night. Occasionally, you'd here the firing of a tank, or the squeaking noise of their metal tracks as they rolled through the neighborhoods. It was kind of exciting. As the sun rose each morning, we'd roam the major streets in the neighborhood looking for M16 shell casings. There were many.

When it was all over, much of the inner city of Detroit had been destroyed. Hundreds of Black as well as White owned businesses were annihilated in a matter of days, 43 people had lost their lives to the senseless violence, and over 7200 people were arrested. The vast majority of owners who lost their businesses never rebuilt in these communities. Now 30 years later, most of the buildings and lots still remain vacant. Detroit never recovered from this event. Many affluent White as well as Black families began their migration into the suburbs following the riot of 1967.

Return to Table of Contents


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Photo from page 136 of Howard Lindsey's, "A History of Black America"; UPI/Bettmann Newsphoto.


Author: Kevin Hollaway

Last updated January 17, 1997




[This message has been edited by classicmixdj (edited May 13, 2001).]
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Old 05-13-2001, 04:32 PM   #4
classicmixdj
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Here your are (from author Kevin Holloway):


The Detroit Riot

During the summer of 1967, violence rocked the city of my birth place. Although 30 years removed, I vividly recall the events of this deadly riot. It was a Sunday afternoon on Grand River avenue near Outer Drive. The vast majority of the stores were closed as was usual on a Sunday afternoon in 1967. A few of the major stores, such as Sears and Federals, were in fact open and did have security guards at hand. The smaller stores, however, were closed and ripe for the pickings.

Early this Sunday morning, the police raided a Black club on 12th street, which was in fact miles away. Apparently, there were more patrons than the police expected and things got a little out of hand. In a matter of hours, word spread of police brutality in the arrests. In a matter of hours, all hell broke loose.

While the city was exploding in violence, several friends and I were watching a movie at the Beverly Theater. Suddenly, the lights came on and mothers streamed down the isles. I looked up and there was my mother. "There's a riot going on", she shouted. At the age of 10, I didn't have the slightest idea what she was talking about. However, as we walked outside the theater, the streets were filled with looters and I quickly learned the meaning of riot. People were running to and from stores with all sorts of merchandise in their arms. I had never seen so many people in this area at one time.

As we drove East down Grand River, while weaving through the crowds of looters, I saw cars with chains attached to their bumpers pulling the security gates off the front of stores. Several businesses simply had cars driven right through the front door for entry into the stores. The ingenuity was truly amazing as these looters worked in unison to loot and pillage businesses that were the life blood of their own community. Not one store in our community was spared.

Many looters looked for places to stash their goods. Most of the parents on my street would not tolerate this sort of behavior. One of my friends and I observed someone driving in the alley behind our house. When we investigated the area, we found several stolen items hidden behind some bushes. We took the items down the alley and hid them behind some other bushes. But after telling my next door neighbors, they went out to the alley, grabbed the items, and brought them into their home. This would be looter was obviously a little surprised when he returned. My friends and I then went down the street to see if the stores on the corner of Northfield and Joy Road had been hit. Sure enough, looters were running from the stores with arms full. The police stood by in their cars doing absolutely nothing. I suppose they figured there were so many people that their efforts would be in vein. Perhaps they were there simply to prevent fires. It didn't matter, the grocery store, cleaners, and other businesses there were burned that very same night.

During most of the day, the neighbors and I sat on our porches and watched the billowing clouds of smoke as one Black business after and another was burned to the ground. We marveled at how ferocious the fires had been, observing the thickness of the smoke and the intensity of the flames to the left and then right, anticipating what would go next. Some fires were put out immediately, but snipers began shooting at the fireman. Helicopters flew around the neighborhoods looking for snipers. The thick foliage over many streets, however, shielded them from their view. The snipers had little regard for human life, especially for these firemen who were all White. At night, residents were ordered to keep all lights off and there was a dusk to dawn curfew. Shots rang out throughout the night. Occasionally, you'd here the firing of a tank, or the squeaking noise of their metal tracks as they rolled through the neighborhoods. It was kind of exciting. As the sun rose each morning, we'd roam the major streets in the neighborhood looking for M16 shell casings. There were many.

When it was all over, much of the inner city of Detroit had been destroyed. Hundreds of Black as well as White owned businesses were annihilated in a matter of days, 43 people had lost their lives to the senseless violence, and over 7200 people were arrested. The vast majority of owners who lost their businesses never rebuilt in these communities. Now 30 years later, most of the buildings and lots still remain vacant. Detroit never recovered from this event. Many affluent White as well as Black families began their migration into the suburbs following the riot of 1967.

Return to Table of Contents


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Photo from page 136 of Howard Lindsey's, "A History of Black America"; UPI/Bettmann Newsphoto.


Author: Kevin Hollaway

Last updated January 17, 1997




[This message has been edited by classicmixdj (edited May 13, 2001).]
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Old 05-14-2001, 11:23 PM   #5
Bob from Mich
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excellent reply!
HerbLovelle on drums,Huey McCracken on gtr. my old album says (in addittion to Red Shea & John Stockfish.Produced by John Simon-he also did SONGS OF by
Leonard Cohen.
Those were volitile times.I wish the whole world could have a 2nd take....

[This message has been edited by Russ Houser (edited May 15, 2001).]
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Old 05-14-2001, 11:23 PM   #6
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excellent reply!
HerbLovelle on drums,Huey McCracken on gtr. my old album says (in addittion to Red Shea & John Stockfish.Produced by John Simon-he also did SONGS OF by
Leonard Cohen.
Those were volitile times.I wish the whole world could have a 2nd take....

[This message has been edited by Russ Houser (edited May 15, 2001).]
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Old 05-25-2001, 07:56 PM   #7
gathrb
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I was able to download this song for the first time & was really impressed with Gord's songwriting on such a negative event. I had downloaded about a minute of it six months ago @ Napster before getting a transfer error. I never dl the whole song until now, the topic has been a sore spot for me being born in Detroit. But I'm glad I did! The pounding drums by Herb Lovelle carry the song along with Gord's cutting lyrics & earnest singing. I think Gord sums it up in the line "...hands of the have-nots keep falling out of reach" Another 6o's classic!

And as you read your morning paper
And you sip your cup of tea
And you wonder just in passing
Is it him or is it me?

[This message has been edited by Tom (edited May 26, 2001).]
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Old 05-25-2001, 07:56 PM   #8
Tom
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I was able to download this song for the first time & was really impressed with Gord's songwriting on such a negative event. I had downloaded about a minute of it six months ago @ Napster before getting a transfer error. I never dl the whole song until now, the topic has been a sore spot for me being born in Detroit. But I'm glad I did! The pounding drums by Herb Lovelle carry the song along with Gord's cutting lyrics & earnest singing. I think Gord sums it up in the line "...hands of the have-nots keep falling out of reach" Another 6o's classic!

And as you read your morning paper
And you sip your cup of tea
And you wonder just in passing
Is it him or is it me?

[This message has been edited by Tom (edited May 26, 2001).]
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Old 07-07-2003, 08:31 PM   #9
Borderstone
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I promise I am not making light of this topic by what I'm posting. I feel since the police raided a black club (in the song and for real) that gives the term black a double meaning. Do you think Gord was going for just one meaning or both? I think it was both but you never know unless you talk to the source. It's been me,later!
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