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Old 04-12-2006, 04:32 PM   #1
Auburn Annie
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Lightfoot's Music Makes Time Stand Still
by Lynn McGuigan - Wednesday, April 12, 2006


Many musicians make a career of writing and performing songs, but few become household names, especially in Canada.

Then there is Gordon Lightfoot–a man whose name and whose songs most Canadians would recognize immediately. From his ballads such as Sundown and If You Could Read My Mind, to his takes on Canadian history such as the Canadian Railroad Trilogy and the Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald, Lightfoot’s music has been heard across the country for nearly 50 years. Sometimes we hear his own recordings, and sometimes we hear other great musicians who regularly cover his songs.

Yet, we all know we are hearing a Lightfoot song.

Right from the beginning of his career, other artists were drawn to his songs. Ian and Sylvia covered Early Morning Rain and For Lovin’ Me.

Peter, Paul and Mary scored a top 40 hit with the latter in 1965. Bob Dylan, Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Barbra Streisand, Sarah McLachlan, Glen Campbell, and Harry Belfonte are just a few of the many other famous artists who have sung Lightfoot songs.

What makes a songwriter so memorable? Why has Lightfoot become so well known? And why are so many other musicians drawn to perform his work? A group of Canadian musicians have gotten together to explore this question in a concert named after one of Lightfoot’s own albums–The Way We Feel.

A veritable who’s who in Canadian folk music themselves, these artists will be performing a number of Lightfoot’s songs at the Charles W. Stockey Centre for the Performing Arts on April 27.

Valdy, a Canadian folk legend in his own right, Saskatchewan’s troubadour Connie Kaldor, and Parry Sound’s own Katherine Wheatley are just a few of the musicians who will perform in this special show. They will all share with us how Lightfoot’s music affected their own songwriting and their own careers.

Lightfoot’s music somehow strikes a chord deep within us all. He has written hundreds of songs that illustrate for us all what folk music truly is–music that speaks to us emotionally, tells our own stories, is simple enough to be performed by anyone, anywhere, yet complex enough to engage us. The rhythm of his music has become part of the fabric of Canada.

Harmony, Lightfoot’s twentieth album, was released in 2004, two years after he suffered a burst artery and a six-week long coma. A collection of all-new, never released music, Harmony shows us Lightfoot is still writing songs, still sharing his innermost emotions with us through his music.

Last year he made a guest appearance on Canadian Idol; the contestants performed selections from his songbook and had an opportunity to meet and work with this living legend.

In February this year, he announced his 2006/07 tour which will take him across Canada again, including his annual performance at Toronto’s Massey Hall.

So is it his longevity as a singer/songwriter that makes him so well-known? Is it his prolific output of approximately 500 songs? Is it his poetic use of words, something about the sound of his voice, the beautiful melodies he pens, the pulse of his music?

Perhaps it is a combination of all of the above. Much of his music is timeless and will remain in the folk lexicon for many generations to come. Lightfoot was one of the first Canadian musicians to gain national and international fame. So, aside from his music, he led the way in showing us that Canada can, and does, produce its own stars in the music industry. Lightfoot has already given us an enduring legacy of songs; we all hope he will write many more.

The Way We Feel is the first of three concerts that will be presented as the Stockey Centre’s Canadian Legends Series this summer. Rik Emmett will perform in the second concert and Buffy Sainte-Marie will give a rare performance in the third.
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Old 04-12-2006, 04:32 PM   #2
Auburn Annie
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Lightfoot's Music Makes Time Stand Still
by Lynn McGuigan - Wednesday, April 12, 2006


Many musicians make a career of writing and performing songs, but few become household names, especially in Canada.

Then there is Gordon Lightfoot–a man whose name and whose songs most Canadians would recognize immediately. From his ballads such as Sundown and If You Could Read My Mind, to his takes on Canadian history such as the Canadian Railroad Trilogy and the Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald, Lightfoot’s music has been heard across the country for nearly 50 years. Sometimes we hear his own recordings, and sometimes we hear other great musicians who regularly cover his songs.

Yet, we all know we are hearing a Lightfoot song.

Right from the beginning of his career, other artists were drawn to his songs. Ian and Sylvia covered Early Morning Rain and For Lovin’ Me.

Peter, Paul and Mary scored a top 40 hit with the latter in 1965. Bob Dylan, Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Barbra Streisand, Sarah McLachlan, Glen Campbell, and Harry Belfonte are just a few of the many other famous artists who have sung Lightfoot songs.

What makes a songwriter so memorable? Why has Lightfoot become so well known? And why are so many other musicians drawn to perform his work? A group of Canadian musicians have gotten together to explore this question in a concert named after one of Lightfoot’s own albums–The Way We Feel.

A veritable who’s who in Canadian folk music themselves, these artists will be performing a number of Lightfoot’s songs at the Charles W. Stockey Centre for the Performing Arts on April 27.

Valdy, a Canadian folk legend in his own right, Saskatchewan’s troubadour Connie Kaldor, and Parry Sound’s own Katherine Wheatley are just a few of the musicians who will perform in this special show. They will all share with us how Lightfoot’s music affected their own songwriting and their own careers.

Lightfoot’s music somehow strikes a chord deep within us all. He has written hundreds of songs that illustrate for us all what folk music truly is–music that speaks to us emotionally, tells our own stories, is simple enough to be performed by anyone, anywhere, yet complex enough to engage us. The rhythm of his music has become part of the fabric of Canada.

Harmony, Lightfoot’s twentieth album, was released in 2004, two years after he suffered a burst artery and a six-week long coma. A collection of all-new, never released music, Harmony shows us Lightfoot is still writing songs, still sharing his innermost emotions with us through his music.

Last year he made a guest appearance on Canadian Idol; the contestants performed selections from his songbook and had an opportunity to meet and work with this living legend.

In February this year, he announced his 2006/07 tour which will take him across Canada again, including his annual performance at Toronto’s Massey Hall.

So is it his longevity as a singer/songwriter that makes him so well-known? Is it his prolific output of approximately 500 songs? Is it his poetic use of words, something about the sound of his voice, the beautiful melodies he pens, the pulse of his music?

Perhaps it is a combination of all of the above. Much of his music is timeless and will remain in the folk lexicon for many generations to come. Lightfoot was one of the first Canadian musicians to gain national and international fame. So, aside from his music, he led the way in showing us that Canada can, and does, produce its own stars in the music industry. Lightfoot has already given us an enduring legacy of songs; we all hope he will write many more.

The Way We Feel is the first of three concerts that will be presented as the Stockey Centre’s Canadian Legends Series this summer. Rik Emmett will perform in the second concert and Buffy Sainte-Marie will give a rare performance in the third.
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Old 04-12-2006, 06:02 PM   #3
charlene
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and also from Parry Sound is David Newland (and Bobby Orr-Boston Bruin hockey player)- the emcee and wonderful performer at the shows!

I'll see the show in Port Hope on the 22nd of April and can not wait!

And again, Jenney can't make it up from Connecticut to keep me company (some acting gig again! - sheesh) and make me behave like the matriarch I am (Jory - I'm gonna get you!) .....

however I will have Lisa and my own mother with me so I promise to be good....They are both huge fans of Jory and Aengus and Lisa loves Lightfoot music so it should be a fun night.

It will be different than Hugh's Room as it's being held at a beautiful old refurbished theatre and not in a dinner/theatre/music room type of place.

They will be north of Toronto in Markham on the 20th and west of Toronto in Oakville on the 21st.
www.jorynash.com has more info in his 'tour dates' section.

see ya soon guys!
Char
I've just looked at the article at the paper's website and they too mention that David is a Parry Sound boy! the pic is of Aengus tho!
lol

[ April 12, 2006, 21:16: Message edited by: charlene ]
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Old 04-12-2006, 06:02 PM   #4
charlene
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and also from Parry Sound is David Newland (and Bobby Orr-Boston Bruin hockey player)- the emcee and wonderful performer at the shows!

I'll see the show in Port Hope on the 22nd of April and can not wait!

And again, Jenney can't make it up from Connecticut to keep me company (some acting gig again! - sheesh) and make me behave like the matriarch I am (Jory - I'm gonna get you!) .....

however I will have Lisa and my own mother with me so I promise to be good....They are both huge fans of Jory and Aengus and Lisa loves Lightfoot music so it should be a fun night.

It will be different than Hugh's Room as it's being held at a beautiful old refurbished theatre and not in a dinner/theatre/music room type of place.

They will be north of Toronto in Markham on the 20th and west of Toronto in Oakville on the 21st.
www.jorynash.com has more info in his 'tour dates' section.

see ya soon guys!
Char
I've just looked at the article at the paper's website and they too mention that David is a Parry Sound boy! the pic is of Aengus tho!
lol

[ April 12, 2006, 21:16: Message edited by: charlene ]
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